CHARRED OAKS INN'S INNKEEPER SERVES NOT JUST PANCAKES, BUT BRITISH PANCAKES ON PANCAKE TUESDAY



The traditional way to eat British pancakes is with a squeeze of lemon juice and a sprinkle of granulated sugar



Around the world, the day before Ash Wednesday has many names including Fat Tuesday, Mardi Gras, Pancake Tuesday and Shrove Tuesday.


This means it's time for a golden, griddled treat. Unlike the fluffy, thick flapjacks popular in the U.S., British pancakes are similar to French crepes. However, they have more egg and are slightly lighter in color.


Here's how to make British Pancakes

  • 2 cups milk

  • 2 eggs

  • pinch salt

  • 1½ cups flour

  • butter for the pan


First place the eggs, milk and salt in a bowl and whisk to combine.

Next add the flour gradually, about ¼ cup at a time, whisking between each addition. Adding the flour slowly helps to reduce lumps. Whisk until smooth.

Next, heat a non-stick pan or skillet over medium heat. Once the pan is warm, add a touch of butter and wait until it starts to simmer.


Add about ¼ cup of pancake batter to the center of the pan and swirl the pan to evenly coat the base with batter.

Cook for about a minute or until the top of the pancake looks dry. Flip and cook for another minute. The pancake should become golden and look similar to a tortilla.

Continue cooking pancakes until all the batter is used. Depending on the size, this recipe makes roughly 12 pancakes.


How to serve British Pancakes

The traditional way to eat British pancakes is with a squeeze of lemon juice and a sprinkle of granulated sugar.

I like to add the lemon first so the sugar sticks to the pancake. Then, roll the pancake into a tube.

These pancakes can be enjoyed with a number of toppings including berries and cream, syrup or Nutella, my dad's favorite. Since the batter has no sugar, they also can be served savory, with cheese and ham or spinach.

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